Saturday, November 28, 2020

The Joys Of Art Photography





















My adventures in photography have taught me things. Valuable things. Joyful things.

One is that "taking a picture" is misunderstood. You don't simply snap a shot with your phone and move along. Rather, you plan excursions to visually-interesting places; you wander new, strange locations; you open yourself up to serendipity with meditative calm; you conceive and execute artistic decisions; and, best of all, you bring home mementos of your experience. It's a full adventure.

You can't predict what scenes will appear before you and those surprises are often delightful. That's just the beginning because you're not recording images, you're creating them. The difference is called "art." Using primitive equipment (like my Holga film-camera) makes the process an even greater challenge and from that crucible comes hand-crafted expression.

Bikers say it's not the destination, it's the journey. And that's what art photography offers us.












12 comments:

  1. I'm so glad you're enjoying the experience, Ally! I can see why, you have a natural eye for photography!

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  2. You do have an eye for photography, Ally! These photos are brilliant! xxx

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  3. Art evokes emotion, so when you pass from simply recording images to capturing emotion, you've created art.

    You do have a really good eye, Ally!

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    1. Thanks, Sheila. Actually I have two of them!

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  4. I do somewhat miss the days of disposable cameras. There was always a certain excitement in getting film developed. You never quite knew if you'd captured gold.

    I dunno if everyone looks back at their photos, especially digitally, but I always do. I still revisit our Philly ones.

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    1. Me, too! Visiting the botanical garden with you was a wonderful experience, as was the restaurant tasting menu. I hope we have more IRL experiences.

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  5. Ah, these are great! We were much more careful with what we snapped in the past!

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    1. Yes, when things cost something, we treat them with greater respect. Digital images, costing nothing, is now often disregarded as having no value.

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  6. Evocative, deeply lovely images and musings on photography, Ally. I nodded along in agreement with line you wrote.

    Autumn Zenith 🧡 Witchcrafted Life

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  7. As someone who does painting, I actually agree with you. There was a time when I more into photography (my cam broke and I didn't buy a new one now I just use cellphone and that doesn't feel the same). I think having an actual camera in hand helps us concentrate better. Limitations can actually be freeing in the creative sense of the word. I think this is what you're experiencing with your cam. Your photographs came up looking very unique and timeless.

    I agree with what you said about photography. A good photograph isn't just an instant capture, there is a lot of work behind a good photograph. It's a different kind of work than making a painting but it requires just as much research, time and effort invested. Making a complicated painting, for example, is never a relaxing thing for me. Every time I set behind a canvas, I can't help thinking- well, that's a lot of time and money down the drain if I don't get this right.

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